Nurburgring 2009: 7:26.7 – Nissan Responds to Porsche’s Comments With Action

April 24th, 2009

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Today Porsche have released a Nurburgring lap time for the 2010 Porsche 911 GT3. Even minus the snails, this Porsche can really motor packing 435 hp and one of the most tuned chassis that money can buy. Via Motor Trend today we learned that Andreas Preuninger, Project Manager at Porsche announced that it’s capable of a 7:40 Nordschleife lap.

According to Motor Trend though, he goes further, and takes another swipe at Nissan. Apparently he’s quite focused on this test they performed where they couldn’t manage to get a GT-R under 7:54 at the same track.

Nissan says otherwise, and yesterday in testing, at the ‘Ring one upped themselves again bettering their previous best of 7:27.56 by almost a second to reel off a mind bending 7:26.7. They haven’t stopped either, another testing session is today.

Finer details on the GT-R’s new lap record forthcoming later and we’ll be sure to update you.

UPDATE: As you can see here we have photos of the actual testing session from yesterday thanks to Kislik from NAGTROC. It seems this is the most likely candidate to have set this time as it is the only base model GT-R seen on the circuit yesterday. It’s a base Euro spec GT-R with standard wheels and tires.

PS. I know you’re all hanging out for SpecV lap times but Mizuno-san has not agreed to allow any to be published so far. There are many reasons this could be so hang in there.

Source: NissanSportz.com
Photo: Kislik (C) Used With Permission – These are of the testing session yesterday.

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GTR News, Nissan News , , , , ,

  1. 240ZR
    May 4th, 2009 at 03:51 | #1

    Two things:

    1) Porsche is handing Nissan free advertising on a silver platter with their silly accusations… &

    2) I’d be interested to see if Porsche are willing to go head to head on track (both on track at the same time). This would show how many secs the GTR beats the Porsche by.

  2. Christos Dimou
    May 6th, 2009 at 19:12 | #2

    The GT-R has three settings for the suspension. An everyday setting or standard setting, a sport setting and a track setting. These three settings are not directly accessible. You have to visit your dealer to make the changes. It is certain IMHO that in Nirb the difference between the “EveryDay” and “Track” suspension setting should be in the range of 1 or 2 tens of seconds. Thus, it could be possible for both parties to speak the truth although not the “whole truth”.

  3. jose freire
    May 14th, 2009 at 10:25 | #3

    hi
    guys

    its simple some reporters dont admit that the gtr is the best super car
    today and tomorrow.
    en they sale the v spec and the 600lm porche explod
    and i like tho see the new nissan mid 45 that nissan dont sale in 80`s

    jose

  4. Conroy
    May 18th, 2009 at 09:20 | #4

    595 owner

    History. Nissan Skyline GTR stretches back to the mid-60s, when Prince automobile company merged with Nissan-Datsun in 1967. The earliest predecessor of the GTR, the S54 2000 GT-B, came second in its very first race in 1964 to the Porsche 904 GTS, to the delight of the home crowd, the Skyline was seen to overtake a Porsche 904GTS during the race. The legend of the GTR Skyline had begun.

    The next generation of the GTR, was the four-door PGC10 2000 GTR which had 33 victories in the one and a half years it raced, its run was ended by a Mazda Savanna RX-3 attempting its 50th consecutive win. The Skyline GTR took 1000 victories by the time it was discontinued in 1972.
    Check NissanSkyline.com for reference!

  5. Conroy
    May 18th, 2009 at 09:35 | #5

    If i was a Porsche fan i would certainly change my mind about it:
    1 they don’t give evidence to back what they are saying
    2 i would be disappointed in the spokesman who OPENLY wept to the media about the GTR claims of beating their time.
    3 the GTR is unstoppable.

  6. May 20th, 2009 at 04:12 | #6

    Why is it that nobody apart from Nissan can get below 7.50? Check others that have taken a stock r35 around the ring not only Porsche’s legendary race winning test driver’s but many others.

    Cheers miss-lead people.

  7. May 26th, 2009 at 04:29 | #7

    Does anybody know of an independent party that has managed better than 7.50 around the ring for the r35??? I’m still looking.

    Porsche GT2 time to 300Km is 33sec, r35 is a whopping 54sec to the same speed. At that speed the GT2 would be some meters in front hu? Half km ahead? One km ahead? Can anybody work this mathematical problem out? Then he holds answer to the fact. The fact that you or me cannot buy a r35 stock to do the same as the Japs claim.

    Cheers all.

  8. Ken
    June 4th, 2009 at 18:26 | #8

    It has many compliance with the power of the GTR …
    Please look at this losers:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nordschleife_fastest_lap_times

  9. andrew
    November 14th, 2009 at 15:34 | #9

    The fact of the matter is that Nissan deconstructed the porsche GT3 in its lab and set out to build a car that would beat it in all aspects of racing (straight line, 0-60, slalom, skid-pad, braking and around ‘the ring’). The fact that the power to weight ratio is in favor of the porsche’s is inconsecential due to the other factors that the GT-R R35 has in it’s favor. These are as follows:

    1) The awd drive system. Nissan has designed, built, and road proven the best awd system on the market to date. The amount of computer power in that vehicle dwarfs anything else out there. Just look at the launch system; multiple switch manipulation in the cockpit and with a simple brake stand any civilian driver can get a 3.3s 0-60 out of the car. Check the top gear youtube video test to confirm this. They only run a 3.5s 0-60 but on a dusty airstrip with much more wheelspin then would occur on a clean track, with a privately owned GT-R that they did not want to flog to its limit.

    2) It has a 50/50 front/rear balance. This is something that can not be overlooked. A lighter, rear engine, rear drive car is much more susceptible to spin under hard trail braking, and/or improper braking technique then one that is perfectly balanced. This drastically affects the time around a track especially one like ‘the ring’ which due to its construction is faster with trail braking on a lot of the turns rather then early braking/late accelerating.

    3) Slalom and skid pad. Yes the GT2 (maybe the GT3) have a faster 0-300 kmh time. But with a starting point like ‘the rinq’ has (check the GT-R 7:29s run on youtube to see the starting point) it doesn’t matter. You are immediately thrown into a 45 degree right that flows in to a down-hill on camber 180 degree left the brings you to the ‘slow’ esses before you get to the first highspeed ‘straight’ section. At this point the GT-R has already carried more speed into and out of this section on all turns. Due to the higher G’s the car is able to withstand without braking traction. By the time they hit the first ‘straight’ section the GT-R is already seconds ahead. True if you started the cars on the back straight the porsche would most likely be ahead heading into the pit area (which is the actual start line) but again would lose that time due to slower entry and exit speeds.

    That being said if you watch the youtube lap that suzuki posted around ‘the ring’. You will notice that the tires are not screeching through each turn and through many of the turns he has 5-10 feet before he hits rumblestrip. If you have any race experience you know that this means he could have gone faster through many of the turns, both entry and exit speeds would/could be faster.

    If porsche took the cayman (which is a mid-engine/rear drive car, with a 50/50 weight balance) and dropped in a GT2 power plant and adjusted the suspension, drivetrain, etc. to the same level im sure that it would be able to post a time similar albeit still slower time then the GT-R.

    Without the same computing power/awd system it is nearly imposible to reach the time of the GT-R. Yes there are many cars that are faster then it around ‘the ring’. However they are not mass produced super cars, they are limited run, barely street legal, vehicles that incorporate carbon monotub cockpits, carbon fiber/ceramic brakes, magnesium/carbon wheels, full race bred suspension, and huge powerplants that are capable of incredible numbers, and are driven by professional race drivers. However if you are a civilian without race driving experience or training you would end up in the wall trying to post a time faster then the GT-R around ‘the ring’ in one of these cars. It is and always will be one of the most dangerous circuits in the world. Hence why they do not run a F1 race around the whole ‘ring’ anymore and have not since 1972.

    If we compare the cost of a GT3/GT2/Enzo Ferrari to the cost of a GT-R we see anywhere from approx. $100k – to $900k difference. So if one were able to buy a stock GT-R and put $200k into it the results would be dramatic. Without the x6 factor taken into account for unsprung rotational mass. Just by changing to magnesium hub carbon fiber wheels and carbon/ceramic brakes (the latter available on GT3/GT2/Turbo porshes)it is possible to remove almost a 100lbs from the GT-R. Thus improving accel., braking, turn-in, skid-pad and slalom numbers. If we continue from there and replace all existing body panels with carbon fiber after market replacements (available online now) just on the exterior we are again able to remove just over 100lbs from the GT-R’s sprung non-rotational mass. This exercise could go on for pages as there are more weight savings on the interior, better downforce production on the exterior and underbody, chassis rigidity with a hidden rollcage, improved accel., braking, less weight, and more lateral G’s with suspension changes. And we haven’t even broached the subject of powerplant yet. Of course there is already a GT-500 kit available for the GT-R, which depending on the level of performance you are after can boost power anywhere from 100 to 400 bhp while cutting weight at the same time.

    All in all if you were able to do all these very possible modifications you would have a vehicle that cost the same as a GT2 but was lighter, more powerfull, sounded better, was much easier to drive, and would certainly post one of the fastest lap times ever recorded around ‘the ring’. Porsche knows this all to well and must due everything in their power to discredit the stock ability and the upgraded potential of the GT-R.

    The boxster is the poor mans porshe that is slower then a M3. The GT-R is a smart mans sleeper beast that would wipe the smug look off of any ferrari/porshe/aston owner who was arrogant enough to rev his engine in challenge at your local stop light.

    It is nicknamed ‘Godzilla’ for a reason, in any level of performance trim from stock to all out. This car is already a classic and just like it’s predecessors will be a classic forever.

  10. November 25th, 2009 at 15:42 | #10

    @959 owner
    it may not have an international race history, but in Japan, Australia and NZ it has one. in japan(JGTC), nissan have been beating Porsche’s since the 70’s!

  11. December 11th, 2009 at 06:30 | #11

    Well, certainly when it comes to initial specs all manufacturers are going to use their in-house drivers, technicians, etc. and as such, there will always be a biased toward lower lap times, higher HP’s, top speeds, etc. But, given that they ALL do it, one has to the numbers for all of them are skewed toward the higher performance. As stated above, all of this do help to keep the competition stiff between lovers of Porsche and lovers of Nissan. If either where interested in having the actual answer, I’m certain it would be easy enough to find an independent driver. I don’t think that’s what they’re going for. I say, just settle it out on the circuit and be done with it.

  12. tutibiri
    January 20th, 2010 at 08:35 | #12

    @Pietro
    Completely right my friend!

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